Erna parked in my driveway at 5:45 p.m., fifteen minutes earlier than our take-off time. A good friend who resides in Romeo with her husband, I appreciate Erna’s punctuality.

She wore a pink jacket and black pants, a floral scarf swathed gracefully around her neck. I chose my yellow-flowered spring coat over a blue floral blouse and black pants. Our love of flowers abides within and upon us.

My guest brought a bag of cookies. “From the freezer,” Erna said. Her freezer’s famous in these parts.

No, that’s not why I offered her the ticket my husband declined for the 53rd Season Spring Concert by the Lapeer County Concert Choir. Erna would’ve been content in her flower and vegetable gardens, so I was grateful she granted me the last few hours of Friday’s daylight. Companionship makes the concert experience more meaningful.

I’d earlier warned Erna of the embarrassing condition of my perennial island, the focal point of our circle drive. Garlic chives invade the garden again. After fighting that hideous plant for years, I’ve not stepped a foot into the ring this spring. Could it be post-traumatic weed syndrome?

Erna shook her head at the troublesome mess. She knows the labor I face.

Sometimes it comes down to this during growing season: a writer has to choose between glorious, colorful blooms, or submitted stories. I don’t have time for both.

Erna drove. I directed. We admired the landscape going north into Metamora-green as I remembered Ireland.

“How old were you when you left Romania for America?” I asked.

“Thirteen.”

“A tender age for such a journey,” I thought out loud.

Erna’s blue eyes sparkled. “I’ll never forget it.”

“How long did it take to cross the Atlantic?”

“Ten days. I was sea-sick seven days.”

“That’s fast for a transcontinental trip,” I said.

“It was a war ship.”

“You weren’t frightened?”

“No. We were so thankful to have a family in America sponsor us.”

“What do you remember most about the voyage?”

“The food. It was delicious. We all ate in a big hall where the sailors ate.” She says discreetly, “And the stench of the latrines.”

I could imagine.

Erna parked in the Hunters Creek Community Church lot in time to greet my two favorite Lapeer Concert Choir sopranos, Marilyn Buchman and Anne Roszczewski.

Erna and I claimed our programs and seats. The choir proceeded up the aisle to the platform and opened their books in unison. The director lifted his baton.

Throughout the program of Bluegrass gospel songs, Erna and I glanced to one another in agreement, moved by the American spirituals.

The choir concluded with Hall Johnson’s “Ain’t Got Time to Die”, a credo that reminds me to consider whom I serve.

“Lord, I keep so busy servin my Master

Keep so busy servin my Master

Ain’t got time to die

Cause when I’m given my all

I’m servin my Master

Ain’t got time to die.”

Dear Reader, I keep so busy writin my stories, ain’t got time to weed.

Contact Iris at irisfarmletters@gmail.com.